About the Doll Family Lectureship on Religion and Money

The Doll Family Lectureship on Religion and Money was established by Henry C. Doll ’58 and his family. It reflects the family’s longstanding interest in the subject of philanthropy and its relationship with religion. Mr. Doll’s father, Edward C. Doll ’25, was a founder and longtime volunteer leader of the Erie Community Foundation in Erie, Pennsylvania. During his career, Henry Doll was staff to a number of family foundations in the Cleveland area. Over the years, father and son discussed the issue of religion and money on many occasions and enjoyed attending foundation conferences together. They shared a strong belief in the importance of giving back to their communities and of sharing one’s resources for the greater good.

The purpose of the lectureship is to bring distinguished speakers to Princeton University who will inspire students, faculty, and the campus community toward a greater understanding of the many - and often neglected – relationships between religion and money in our own time and historically. These include such topics as philanthropy, which has often been encouraged by religious values; personal responsibilities in the use of money, which for many people are grounded in religious teachings, questions about the stewardship of one’s time and money; considerations about the ethical issues associated with wealth and poverty; and the influence of religious values upon individual and corporate decisions. An important objective of the lectureship will be to present the perspectives of the various religious traditions in ways that encourage greater understanding of their teachings on the subject and that might inspire their followers to exercise greater generosity.   

The lectureship will bring speakers to campus who are scholars in the field as well as persons who represent the viewpoints of management, finance, business leadership and philanthropy. It is anticipated that a single lecture will be offered each year under the auspices of the Center for the Study of Religion, possibly in partnership with other academic units on campus as well as selected organizations outside of the University.